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Re: Tom Petty's new Rose Morris style one offs

PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 9:33 pm
by hjarnett
I think it's time for ric to do a new Tom petty sig a 1993

Tom Petty's new Rose Morris style one offs

PostPosted: Mon Jun 04, 2012 10:55 pm
by 8mileshigher
JakeK wrote:Mark: I believe the reason Tom does traditional stringing is because he either prefers it or he doesn't know Rickenbacker's way of stringing.

After 2 years, I learned that Mike Campbell DOES know the Rickenbacker way. While his '63 625/12 CM108 may have been strung traditionally, it was "like that when [Mike] bought it", his '65 360/12 NS and '66 360/12 OS are strung properly.



Jake, as you are our resident TP aficionado/expert (and as you just saw TP&HB on tour), can you kindly clarify that the new one-off RMs the factory just made were strung with our well-known Ric stringing sequence and approriate Ric 12-string nuts or is it being speculated that TP had a new nut cut to reverse the string order for so-called "traditional" 12-string sequencing, with the octaves first in the sequence ? :roll: If TP was going to change the nut and go "traditional" wouldn't he have ordered the one-off that way from the factory ?

Re: Tom Petty's new Rose Morris style one offs

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 4:51 am
by admin
Wouldn't that be an interesting offering, a Tom Petty 1993 model with traditional "non-RIC" stringing.

Re: Tom Petty's new Rose Morris style one offs

PostPosted: Tue Jun 05, 2012 12:34 pm
by JakeK
Here's a picture from when the left the factory. It appears they were strung the Ric way. I wasn't that close to Tom when I saw him at Jazzfest to see if the new 1993 was strung Ric or traditionally. This picture from last Friday's show at Haifax Metro Center, and it's unclear. Anyone wanna help me?

Re: reverse stringing

PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 2:01 pm
by chuckk1
I have a 1967 360-12 (modified to a 370 - I installed a center pup). About a year after I bought it, I reversed the stringing after I had heard that Carl Wilson was doing same. Of course, the difficulties encountered because of the nut slots were many, ultimately solved by using aluminum foil shims...a real pain in the butt but it worked. A couple years ago, I read that most conventional stringing for 12 string guitars was actually the high first, then the low, and that John Hall had intended his 12 string guitars to be just the opposite. Last year, I went back to "John's way" and restrung mine in its original fashion. Much to my dismay, it was much more difficult to play and the reason was very enlightening. The natural radius of a player's fingertips at the point of contact with the lower strings seems to conform much better when the octave string is first. With Hall's stringing, I find very often that when fretting the low (12th and 11th?) string(s), my fingertips won't fully depress the high octave string to the fret because the low string's size and diameter acts like a 'stop'. When the strings were reversed, I never had this problem, even with the screwball shims and improper nut slot heights. I am now in the process of having a new custom nut cut for my Ricky.

Re: reverse stringing

PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 11:18 pm
by Ontario_RIC_fan
chuckk1 wrote:I have a 1967 360-12 (modified to a 370 - I installed a center pup). About a year after I bought it, I reversed the stringing after I had heard that Carl Wilson was doing same. Of course, the difficulties encountered because of the nut slots were many, ultimately solved by using aluminum foil shims...a real pain in the butt but it worked. A couple years ago, I read that most conventional stringing for 12 string guitars was actually the high first, then the low, and that John Hall had intended his 12 string guitars to be just the opposite. Last year, I went back to "John's way" and restrung mine in its original fashion..


While John Hall did indeed work at the Factory in the 1960s, as he was a teenager at the time, no one likely paid much attention to his opinions as to how guitars should be strung one way or the other. He has shared that one of his jobs was driving a green Ford Econoline van full of instruments from the factory on Kilson Drive to the sales offices, which prior to 1989 were in two different buildings several miles apart.

It was not until the 480 model in 1973 - with its modular pick guard - that they finally let John Hall do some Guitar design work. After he and his wife bought the company from his father in October 1984, a number of design features were refined, and these are indeed John's work.

I expect you are confusing him with his father F.C. Hall, who along with Paul Barth, Dick Burke and Roger Rossmeisl made all of the design decisions in 1963 and 1964 that led to the RIC 12 string.

Re: reverse stringing

PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2016 11:27 pm
by jps
Ontario_RIC_fan wrote:
chuckk1 wrote:It was not until the 480 model in 1973 - with its modular pick guard - that they finally let John Hall do some Guitar design work.

I thought the model was a 490?

Re: reverse stringing

PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 12:51 am
by Ontario_RIC_fan
jps wrote:
Ontario_RIC_fan wrote:
chuckk1 wrote:It was not until the 480 model in 1973 - with its modular pick guard - that they finally let John Hall do some Guitar design work.

I thought the model was a 490?


You are correct typo on my end! Or Brain Freeze :-) It is the model with the 430 body shape and binding on both sides. It is not a 480 that looks like a bass but has 6 strings. My Bad. :oops:

Re: Tom Petty's new Rose Morris style one offs

PostPosted: Sun Feb 28, 2016 1:36 am
by jps
No worries; just be glad you don't have to keep track of all the various Ferrari models from the late 1940s up to the present time!

http://auto.ferrari.com/en_EN/sports-ca ... ast-model/

Note: There are some models an specials missing in these listings along with all the Formula 1 cars.